Haitian orphanage fire was not Feed My Lambs

  • Sad scene: a staff member of the Orphanage of the Church of Bible Understanding stands inside one of the bedrooms, the morning after a fire broke out at the facility in Kenscoff, on the outskirts of Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Friday (Photograph by Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

    Sad scene: a staff member of the Orphanage of the Church of Bible Understanding stands inside one of the bedrooms, the morning after a fire broke out at the facility in Kenscoff, on the outskirts of Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Friday (Photograph by Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)


A fire that killed at least 15 children at an orphanage in Haiti has devastated the country, a Bermudian resident said yesterday.

Phillip Rego, who runs an orphanage in Haiti, said: “They’re sad.

“A lot of people sent me a lot of texts — some of them thought it was mine.”

Mr Rego was speaking after at least 15 children were killed in a fire last week at the Orphanage of the Church of Bible Understanding, in a suburb of Port-au-Prince, the country’s capital.

It is thought a candle started the fire.

The orphanage was run by the Church of Bible Understanding, a Pennsylvania, United States-based non-profit group.

The group, which has worked in Haiti since 1977, has a second orphanage in the country.

Jovenel Moïse, the Haitian president, said that he was “deeply moved” by the tragedy and that officials should “adopt urgent measures” to establish the cause of the fire.

Mr Rego is the founder of Feed My Lambs Ministry, located in Montrouis, about 45 miles from Port-au-Prince.

The charity, founded in 2008, runs an orphanage, school and clinic.

Mr Rego said he “couldn’t even imagine” the thought of a similar tragedy at Feed My Lambs.

He added: “You get all these kids and you try and take them off the street to give them a better life.”

Mr Rego said that orphanages in Haiti were “a refuge for kids that have no possibilities”.

He added that he did not know any of the people who worked at the fire-hit orphanage, but that they all had problems in common.

Mr Rego said that political unrest in the poverty-stricken country had led to violent clashes which affected the poorest people.

He explained: “No one’s coming to Haiti — so there’s a shortage of help. It’s not like a peaceful environment as you’re walking around.”

Mr Rego asked Bermudians to help groups on the ground in Haiti.

He said: “Find an organisation that has proven itself. All of us are doing good in some way.”

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Published Feb 20, 2020 at 8:00 am (Updated Feb 20, 2020 at 6:47 am)

Haitian orphanage fire was not Feed My Lambs

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